sustainable

Roof Overhangs

I love roof overhangs on so many levels. On the symbolic level they convey a sense of protection and security as they shield us from the elements. They’re welcoming, like open arms saying, “…hello, here is the entry, come inside”.
On a purely functional level they are great climate modifiers, keeping the walls dry at critical joints, and are particularly effective at shading summer sun.
As a crusty waterproofing consultant once told me “I would be out of business if every building had generous roof overhangs; a poorly designed or constructed detail will not leak a bit if it doesn’t get wet”.  At Stillwater we have embraced generous roof overhangs and always try and employ them, particularly over windows.

Carbon Tax Debate Heats Up

It was good to hear Dan Charles of NPR interview Bjorn Lomborg, a former global warming skeptic, as they discussed what few people and fewer politicians want to talk about: a carbon tax.
It seems to me a tax system that encouraged people to work hard by mainly lowering income tax and encouraged people to use less fossil fuel by taxing carbon, would be a better way to go. To achieve a greater independence from fossil fuels it’s most effective to have both carrots and sticks. The good thing about a carbon tax is it would be effective, transparent, and not nearly as susceptible to manipulation and gaming as can be the case with incentives. If such a tax caused the average new home size to drop by 300sf, would that be such a bad thing? Bjorn Lomborg, the controversial Danish economist, has pushed his way back into the global warming debate with a book that proposes “smart solutions” to climate change. Those promised solutions rely heavily on R&D aimed at making clean energy cheap, rather than attempts to shut down dirty energy sources. Lomborg says his views haven’t changed, but more people are willing to listen to him because international negotiations on limiting greenhouse emissions have accomplished so little. Dan Charles

Carbon-Neutral, Sustainable Housing Community Still Thrives in London

If you haven’t already read about the BEDZED project on the outskirts of London, it’s worth a look. A trendsetter at the time, its still is one of the go-to examples of zero energy sustainable housing of significant scale. Eye catching as it is, the front facades may well be too uniform and anonymous for American urbanites not accustomed to the row house so ubiquitous in the “suburbs” of the United Kingdom. Kate Andrews of Inhabitat explores further:
BEDZED: Beddington Zero Energy Development in London
“The Beddington Zero Energy Development (BEDZED) may not be new news, but is a fabulous example of innovative, zero-energy, sustainable housing on a multi-unit scale. The residential and workspace development in the London borough of Sutton is a carbon-neutral community with plentiful green spaces, recycling facilities, water saving features, and a legally binding green transport plan. It’s the whole kit-and-caboodle of sustainable living, and has been a flourishing green community since its conception in 2002.”

Livable Cities are Bike-Friendly

The New York Times T Magazine design section recently showcased the stylish Linus bicycle:
And a few days later the BBC picked up the trend of America’s increased interest in bicycles as transportation, not merely recreation:
“America is known for its enduring love affair with the automobile. But in the last few years cities across the US have reported a surge in bicycle use, as people search for greener, healthier – and cheaper – transport options.”
However:
“…even the most bike-friendly US cities have years to go before catching European cities such as Copenhagen, where an estimated 30% of residents commute to work or school on a bicycle.
But Copenhagen cyclists have benefited from decades of pro-bike planning decisions, while US urban planners must overcome a century of energy politics and urban policy designed to promote vehicle use.”
Read the entire story over on BBC online
Cycle commuting in the US
Portland, Oregon – 5.96%
Minneapolis – 4.27%
Seattle – 2.94%
Sacramento – 2.72%
San Francisco – 2.72%
Washington, DC – 2.33%
Oakland – 2.15%
Tucson – 2.04%
Albuquerque – 1.75%
US – 0.55%
Source: US Census Bureau

Housing Design Now: A Small Matter

Sarah Susanka is rather ironic, a bestselling author and ahead of her time. And now, every developer and real estate agent who would dismiss her “Not So Small” approach as a “niche” are suddenly all over her maxim. Her latest book on residential architecture is reviewed in the Atlantic City Weekly.
Downsizing the McMansion
Book Review: ‘More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home’
By Sarah Susanka
“Bigness, that staple of American values and culture, is, in the words of Heidi Klum, “Out.” (Note the capital “O.”) Mega, ultra, super, jumbo stuff has generally declined in popularity over this recent recession, first motivated by cost-cutting and, later, by the realization that life smells just as sweet (or even sweeter) without all the “extra” our bodies and budgets are perfectly capable of doing without.
In early 2009, the story broke that American homes were trending down in size for the first year in many. Authorities from the National Association of Home Builders, the American Institute of Architects and even groups of real estate professionals started noticing homeowners at all income levels beginning to express a preference for smaller, better-built homes — some even before the recession. And they project that the trend will continue when the recession is just a memory.
Enter Sarah Susanka, an architect and advocate of homes that are smaller, practically and efficiently designed, yet still beautiful and comfortable. With her first book a decade back, “The Not So Big House,” Susanka likely felt like the lone voice of reason crying out against excessively large homes in the wilderness of rapidly multiplying McMansions that was the American new-home market at the time.”

Materials for Modern Design: I Love Perfect Plank

Perfect Plank has long been a favorite material of mine. It’s a beautiful, versatile material for tables, stair treads, light shelves, bookshelves, countertops, column wraps and the like. It comes in alder, maple, plantation grown mahogany and even western red cedar for outdoor use.
Made to Last
Made from “finger jointing” and laminating off-cuts and wood from renewable sources, the lads at Perfect Plank offer a great value product. I love its heft; you can see and feel its thickness, up to a couple of inches. Because it’s not a veneer, dings and scratches can be sanded out and the surface refinished.
It’s a permanent, renewable, refinish-able, reusable and biodegradable material that will last for generations.
http://www.perfectplank.com/